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Darcizzle Shows You How To Properly Fillet A Mahi Mahi

Darcie aka ‘Darcizzle’, has been on the water since the age of 3 when she started tagging along with her father fishing and lobstering on an 18′ Gheenoe out of Miami, Florida; her hometown. She currently lives in Boynton Beach, FL and fishes weekly on a the 23′ SEADEK Proline out of Boynton Beach Inlet. Darcie recently quit her full-time desk job after 5 years to pursue her fishing dreams!

She is now a full-time YouTuber and outdoors/fishing girl while providing fishing tips, tricks, how-to’s, techniques & more! Darcie also finds the time to go to college at FAU to complete her bachelor’s degree when she’s not fishing/filming!

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In this particular video, Darcie shows us how to fillet a Mahi Mahi.

The mahi-mahi or common dolphinfish is a surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore temperate, tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and a single long-based dorsal fin extending from the head almost to the tail. Mature males have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper.

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Females have a rounded head. Their caudal fins and anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, and bright blues and greens on the sides and back. The pectoral fins of the mahi-mahi are iridescent blue. The flank is broad and golden. Out of the water, the fish often change color (giving rise to their Spanish name, dorado, “golden”), going though several hues before finally fading to a muted yellow-grey upon death.

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