Connect with us

Great American Outdoors

Sharks

Shocking Video Reveals How Scientists Panic As Live Mutant Sharks Are Found Inside Underwater Volcano

‘Mutant’ sharks living in an active underwater volcano….sounds like something right out of a Sci-fi flick and just how is something like this possible? Scientists have been left stunned after discovering live ‘mutant’ sharks living inside underwater volcanoes in the South Pacific.

A shark surprised a team of researchers exploring the Solomon Islands – by turning up fairly unexpected place.

Trending: This Is The DEADLIEST Bullet Ever Invented

Sleeper sharks, though rarely observed, are native to the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, as well as Antarctica and Tasmania. But this Pacific sleeper shark startled researchers, showing up just east of Papua New Guinea inside an active volcano.

“We were freaking out,” said University of Rhode Island Ph.D student Brennan Phillips to National Geographic.

take our poll - story continues below

Will You Be Voting In Person November 3rd?

  • Will You Be Voting In Person November 3rd?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Great American Outdoors updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Observing volcanic activity earlier this year, Phillips and his colleagues were dropping video camera packages into the deep sea near to the Solomon Islands. After retrieving the footage of one such “drop”, they noticed something strange and blob-like on one of the video’s thumbnails.

The odd, “large brown blob” was later identified through its coloration and physical characteristics as a Pacific sleeper shark, which makes the volcanologists’ sighting the southernmost ever of the species ever documented.

“Our goal is to send instrumentation there to get meaningful data, but sometimes it’s really fun to just blow stuff up,” says National Geographic explorer and ocean engineer Brennan Phillips.

Phillips reunited with his 2015 expedition mates—Alistair Grinham of University of Queensland and Matthew Dunbabin of Queensland University of Technology and Director of GFB Robotics—to once again venture about 20 miles off the coast of the Solomon Islands to the Pacific Ocean’s violent Kavachi volcano.

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

Continue Reading

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

To Top
STAY IN THE LOOP
Don't miss a thing. Sign up for our email newsletter to become a Patriot Outdoor News insider.

Send this to a friend