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Great American Outdoors

Snakes

What To Do When Bitten By An Anaconda

If an anaconda bites your hand, should you pull your hand out, or push it in further, or give the snake a good poke in the eye? National Geographic tells you as part of their series of “Survival Guide Videos.” In the video below, you can watch a herpetologist get bitten in the hand and, fortunately, get free.

Biting the anaconda in the middle of its body may not have the same effect as biting the tip of the tail. Anacondas are very thick, so you may not be able to do any real damage unless you get a weak spot. If the anaconda bites you, push your hand further into its mouth to escape the it’s backward facing teeth. Anacondas have curved teeth, so trying to pull your hand out will impale it further.

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The name anacondas refers to a whole genus of Boa constrictor snakes which kill their prey by squeezing them to death. Although no one is sure how big anacondas can get, most scientists believe that the largest are 25 feet long or even longer. These snakes are more than big enough to squeeze a human to death. Fortunately, they rarely do.

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Don’t go walking alone in areas with anacondas. You are a more appealing target if you are by yourself, and you won’t have anyone to help you out.

Try not to get gripped in the first place. Stay out of the shallow rivers anacondas like. If you do see a snake, don’t get close to it. Watch out to see if it is tracking your movement, following you, and flicking its tongue. These are signs that it is getting ready to strike.

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